Experts reveal why sales of children’s mental health books have skyrocketed

Mindfulness and mental health issues might not be topics you associate with children as young as two – yet the publishing industry is experiencing a boom in children’s books on the subject .

Deals are available for youngsters of almost all ages – from the Rachel Bright Collection, which is aimed at children aged two and up, to Elizabeth Day’s best-selling Failosophy for children aged 12 and over.

Series marketed for children include ‘Mr Men, Little Miss, Discover You’ and ‘Little Big Feelings’, both of which are aimed at young people looking to explore their emotions and well-being.

Experts told FEMAIL that the boom is “lucrative for publishers” and enables a “new genre about personal development, self-esteem and children’s mental health”.

Pop culture expert Nick Ede said: “The rise of wellness books for under-17s is a trend that will only become more lucrative for publishers and more in demand by consumers.

Sales of children’s books on mental health and wellbeing have skyrocketed after the Covid-19 pandemic, with experts calling it a ‘lucrative’ genre for publishers (pictured, The Day You Begin, which teaches children how to trust who they are)

Some of the books on sale in the genre are marketed to children as young as two, including Rachel Bright's The Worrysaurus.

Some of the books on sale in the genre are marketed to children as young as two, including Rachel Bright’s The Worrysaurus.

“The idea of ​​children’s books based on personal development, self-esteem and mental health may seem awake to some, but they are also very helpful in the development of children and genuinely support their lifestyle and that of their their parents.

“With the change in Mr Men books having a lot more meaning and advice, it shows that this trend is not going to stop.

“For booksellers, it’s a new way of exploiting the purchasing power of families.

“It’s not about relying on the magic of fantasy books, but about opening young minds to become more aware and create conversation between families.

Pop culture expert Nick Ede said the genre

Pop culture expert Nick Ede said the genre is ‘growing and there’s no stopping it’ (pictured, Slow Down and Be Here Now, which is aimed at kids aged eight and up)

‘Whether it’s his positive children’s books like Scott Harrison’s The Grumpy Gorilla and The Hungry Hippo or Marcus Rashford’s new book with Carl Anka called You Can Do It and You Are a Champion.

“Self-help books are growing and there’s no stopping them.”

Counselor and psychotherapist Julia Keys explained that books could help children develop emotional awareness.

She said: “No child is born feeling like they’re not good enough.

“These are feelings absorbed by their environment. It’s a well-known fact that mental health problems often begin in early childhood.

“Social expectations and the pressure to conform increase the susceptibility to developing mental health problems and low self-esteem, especially among young people.

A number of publishers have launched a series on children's mental health and wellbeing - including Little Big Feelings

A number of publishers have launched a series on children’s mental health and wellbeing – including Little Big Feelings

“Children with higher emotional intelligence are known to be more able to pay attention, are more engaged in school, have more positive relationships, and are more empathetic.”

Meanwhile, she noted that there had been a change in children’s behavior since the pandemic.

She added: “Since Covid-19 I have worked with children struggling with separation anxiety and lack of confidence because their normal social interactions were interrupted during lockdown.

“For these remedial children, and indeed for any child, there are many benefits to developing their social and emotional skills naturally.”

Meanwhile, even the Mr Men have launched a series

Meanwhile, even the Mr Men have launched a ‘Discover You’ series, which offers advice on dealing with anxiety (pictured), building resilience and celebrating diversity

According to The Guardian, children’s publishers such as Magic Cat Publishing report that sales of “mindfulness” and “emotional well-being” books for under-10s are up 40% year over year. other since 2021.

Meanwhile, data from Nielsen Bookscan indicates that to date there has been an 18% increase in ‘mental health’ books for children compared to this time in 2021.

The increase since 2019 is even greater at 76%.

Books available for children include the new Mr Men Little Miss Discover You series, which explores emotions and well-being.

Issues include books on worry, building resilience and “celebrating diversity”.

Meanwhile, author Elizabeth Day is set to launch a version of Failosophy for kids ages 12 and up.

Meanwhile, author Elizabeth Day is set to launch a version of Failosophy for kids ages 12 and up.

Another series, marketed for toddlers, is called Little Big Feelings and includes expert advice for parents.

Elsewhere, Elizabeth Day is set to launch a version of Failosophy for children aged 12 and over.

Experts say the growing need for youth mental health services has been driven by the pandemic and the impact of closings and school closures.

Almost 400,000 children and young people were in contact with mental health services in July, according to the most recent NHS figures, an increase of around 50,000 on the same period last year.